The History of London’s Housing Stock

Discover how London’s housing has evolved throughout the decades with our interactive tool

London has grown exponentially as it’s evolved into the megacity we know today. The 32 boroughs that make up this thriving metropolis are unique in their own right and from a historical perspective, each one has a notable and unique story. From the luxurious pre-1900 houses and garden squares in Knightsbridge, to the housing expansion and regeneration around Canary Wharf in recent years, London’s homes are as diverse as its inhabitants.

With this in mind, Knight Frank is pleased to launch a new, interactive report aimed at sharing unique insight into the Capital’s housing history for both residents and visitors alike. Our interactive tool uses housing data from the past 120 years, to visualise 14 unique stories connected to some of the Capital’s most notable areas. These boroughs showcase the dramatic changes in that area, while also highlighting their significance to the overall landscape of London’s housing.

To begin, click on an area or select a borough from the drop-down list.

Understand and compare complex data with our helpful infographics and read the full narrative to learn all about each London borough.

hammersmith and fulham area

Barking & Dagenham Brent Islington Camden Tower Hamlets Harrow City of London Westminster Southwark Lambeth Wandsworth Kensington Richmond Upon Thames Hammersmith & Fulham

Housing Stock in Hammersmith & Fulham

Victorian-era industrialisation and the need for worker accommodation in this south west London borough have left Hammersmith & Fulham as one of the areas with the highest concentration of pre-1900s housing stock in the capital.

hammersmith and fulham

Age of Housing Stock in

Pre 1900
52.81%

hammersmith and fulham
  •  
    Pre 1900
    52.81%
  •  
    1900-1918
    8.52%
  •  
    1919-1929
    4.05%
  •  
    1930-1939
    6.62%
  •  
    1945-1954
    2.60%
  •  
    1955-1964
    3.66%
  •  
    1965-1972
    3.59%
  •  
    1973-1982
    4.24%
  •  
    1983-1992
    4.59%
  •  
    1993-1999
    2.31%
  •  
    2000-2009
    5.04%
  •  
    2010-2014
    1.57%

"Previously an area of marshland, market gardens and a few large estates, late Victorian industrialisation set the foundations of the borough’s urban development."

Victorian-era industrialisation and the need for worker accommodation in this south west London borough have left Hammersmith & Fulham as one of the areas with the highest concentration of pre-1900s housing stock in the capital.

fulham hammersmith train station

Urbanisation and laying the foundation of Hammersmith & Fulham’s housing stock

Hammersmith & Fulham really only came to exist as it is known today in the latter half of the 1800’s. Previously an area of marshland, market gardens and a few large estates, late Victorian industrialisation set the foundations of Fulham’s urban development.

fulham victorian housing

The need for labourers and construction workers to build London’s expanding rail network fueled the building of worker accommodation in west London, including terraced houses and cottages as people moved from the countryside to service the capital’s railways lines, factories and growing middle class.

Fulham remained a mostly working class area until World War II, with the exception of wealthier pockets such as the top of Lillie Road, Parsons Green and the area surrounding the Hurlingham Club.

The 80’s and beyond

Post-World War II Fulham was a very local market with families having lived in the area often for generations. However, as house prices rose in the 80’s and 90’s, residents could afford more spacious properties in areas such as Surrey or Richmond. As Fulham’s old guard cashed in, a new breed of resident moved in.

Young professionals and families bought up Fulham’s terraced houses, taking the area’s housing stock on an upward price growth trajectory ever since; today the area is considered as part of ‘prime London’.

fulham modern property

For more information, visit our Hammersmith office.

21st property development

Much of the high concentration of Victorian housing stock in Fulham attests its vigorous 19th century industrial and urban development and there have been few additions to the area’s architectural DNA.

There are a number of luxury modern apartments being built but development levels have been nowhere near the other boroughs of London due to available space.

Luxury new residential development, Lillie Square, is part of the Earls’ Court regeneration scheme and is one of the most anticipated new housing developments in the area.

"Luxury new residential development, Lillie Square, is part of the Earls’ Court regeneration scheme and is one of the most anticipated new housing developments in the area."

Click on the links below to explore other boroughs in London

London’s historical housing stock data comes from the Valuation Office Agency (VOA) and was analysed by Knight Frank