The History of London’s Housing Stock

Discover how London’s housing has evolved throughout the decades with our interactive tool

London has grown exponentially as it’s evolved into the megacity we know today. The 32 boroughs that make up this thriving metropolis are unique in their own right and from a historical perspective, each one has a notable and unique story. From the luxurious pre-1900 houses and garden squares in Knightsbridge, to the housing expansion and regeneration around Canary Wharf in recent years, London’s homes are as diverse as its inhabitants.

With this in mind, Knight Frank is pleased to launch a new, interactive report aimed at sharing unique insight into the Capital’s housing history for both residents and visitors alike. Our interactive tool uses housing data from the past 120 years, to visualise 14 unique stories connected to some of the Capital’s most notable areas. These boroughs showcase the dramatic changes in that area, while also highlighting their significance to the overall landscape of London’s housing.

To begin, click on an area or select a borough from the drop-down list.

Understand and compare complex data with our helpful infographics and read the full narrative to learn all about each London borough.

harrow area

Barking & Dagenham Brent Islington Camden Tower Hamlets Harrow City of London Westminster Southwark Lambeth Wandsworth Kensington Richmond Upon Thames Hammersmith & Fulham

Housing Stock in Harrow

Just under half of all residential housing in Harrow was built in the 1930s.

harrow area

Age of Housing Stock in

1930-1939
45.49%

harrow area
  •  
    Pre 1900
    2.74%
  •  
    1900-1918
    8.30%
  •  
    1919-1929
    11.09%
  •  
    1930-1939
    45.49%
  •  
    1945-1954
    5.01%
  •  
    1955-1964
    4.90%
  •  
    1965-1972
    4.26%
  •  
    1973-1982
    4.77%
  •  
    1983-1992
    4.50%
  •  
    1993-1999
    1.51%
  •  
    2000-2009
    4.94%
  •  
    2010-2014
    2.44%

"Mostly farmland until the late 1800s, Harrow became an attractive and affordable area due to its accessibility to London thanks to the introduction of electric railways."

Just under half of all residential housing in Harrow was built in the 1930s; a testament to the frenetic expansion of wider London areas that took place during the 20th century.

Mostly farmland until the late 1800s, Harrow became an attractive and affordable area due to its accessibility to London thanks to the introduction of electric railways. The subsequent shorter commutes prompted substantial residential development on land owned by the Metropolitan Railway Company.

Much of this North West London suburb’s housing consisted of Edwardian semi-detached houses and flats.

early harrow 1700s early harrow on the hill

harrow on the hill housing

21st Century property development

Harrow is currently implementing the ‘Harrow & Wealdstone Intensification Project’ which aims to regenerate the area and deliver new housing. The former Kodak factory and surrounding land has had planning permission approved for redevelopment which will include 1,800 new homes.

harrow kodak factory

Click on the links below to explore other boroughs in London

London’s historical housing stock data comes from the Valuation Office Agency (VOA) and was analysed by Knight Frank